Thursday, August 30, 2018

Thousands of Indian Asylum Seekers in US Jails

Over 4,200 Indians have so far been jailed for illegally crossing US-Mexico border this year, according to available data reported by US media. It's a big jump from 3,100 Indians detained in all of 2017.  Most are seeking asylum based on claims of religious and political persecution in their country of origin.

Source: LA Times
Undocumented Indians in US Detention: 

Portland-based newspaper "The Oregonian" found that the single largest group of detainees at Sheridan Federal Prison in Oregon came from India. It reported that there were 50 Indians among the 124 migrants being housed at the prison. The others hailed from Nepal, Armenia, Brazil, Mexico and parts of Central America.

India Fastest Growing Source of Illegals:

India has become the biggest source of illegal immigrants crossing into the United States.  In 2014 about 136,000 people came to the U.S. from India, about 128,000 from China and about 123,000 from Mexico, census figures show. As recently as 2005, Mexico sent more than 10 times as many people to the U.S. as China, and more than six times as many as India, according to the WSJ story.

United States Department of Homeland Security estimates that there were 12.1 million undocumented immigrants living in the United States as of 2014. The top countries of origin are:

Mexico = 6.6 million

El Salvador = 700,000

Guatemala = 640,000

India = 430,000

Honduras = 400,000

Philippines = 360,000

Religious Hostilities in Modi's India:

The rise of Hindutva forces is tearing India apart along caste and religious lines.  Hindu mobs are lynching Muslims and Dalits. A recent  Pew Research report confirms that the level of hostility against religious minorities in India is "very high", giving India a score of 9.5 on a scale from 0 to 10. Pakistan's score on this scale is 7 while Bangladesh's is 7.5.

Chart Courtesy of Bloomberg

Summary:

Rising hostility against minorities in India has earned it a score of 9.5 on a scale of 0-10 assessed by Pew Research. This is manifested in a big jump in the number of Indians seeking asylum in the United States. Over 4,200 Indians have so far been jailed for illegally crossing US-Mexico border this year, according to available data reported by US media. It's a big jump from 3,100 Indians detained in all of 2017.  Most are seeking asylum based on claims of religious and political persecution in their country of origin.

Related Links:

Haq's Musings

Story of New York's Little Pakistan

Illegal Immigration From India to US

How to Escape From India?

Deep Divisions Tearing India Apart

India's Share of World's Poor Jumps to 33%

Caste Apartheid in India

Untouchables: My Family's Triumphant Escape from India's Caste System

Female Genocide Unfolding in India

Riaz Haq Youtube Channel

VPOS Youtube Channel

7 comments:

r_sundar said...

Modiphobia stroked by the Congress controlled Indian media, which is far different from reality. There is a well known syndicate that seek asylum with the intention of immigrating.

Anonymous said...

Thanks for highlighting the plight of Indian asylum seekers repressed by Modi regine. Hope intellectuals like you can fight the unjust US regime under trump and granting us entry.

Riaz Haq said...

#Indian #rupee is in a free-fall. On Sep 3, #INR closed below Rs71 per dollar mark for the first time ever. It came a mere 18 days after it ended below the key Rs70 threshold. Since January, #India's #currency has already depreciated by 10%. https://qz.com/india/1377219/ via @qzindia

Asia’s worst-performing currency is simply unable to break its fall.

On Sept. 03 the rupee closed below the Rs71 per dollar mark for the first time ever. This came a mere 18 days after it ended below the key Rs70 threshold. Since January, the Indian currency has already depreciated by 10%.

The news that the Indian economy grew at a sprightly 8.2% in the April-June period, the highest in nine quarters, provided some cushion, but only so much. “…with the environment we are in right now, the rupee is more likely to track global cues,” IFA Global, a forex advisory firm, said in a report.


Crude prices: In the past many weeks, international crude oil price, which had stabilised in the April-June quarter, has been on the rise again. In the last fortnight alone, it gained $7 per barrel and the crude oil futures were trading above $75 per barrel on Sept. 03. Considering that India imports nearly 80% of its fuel needs, rising oil prices leads to a higher dollar bill which, in turn, weakens the rupee.

Current account deficit: Rising oil prices and a weakening rupee mean that India’s current account deficit may widen to 2.8% of the GDP this financial year, up from 1.9% last year, according to a report by Nomura Research. This year, the deficit has already jumped to a nearly five-year high of $18 billion. This only adds further pressure on the rupee.

International developments: The situation in Turkey is taking a toll on currencies of the emerging markets. The Turkish lira has already lost over 40% of its value this year. Last month, the US imposed higher tariffs on imports of steel, aluminium, and other commodities from Turkey which has set off turbulence in the latter’s economy.

Besides the US-Turkey confrontation, there is also the bigger US-China trade war brewing. The two countries have also been increasing duties on each other’s goods. Some observers view this as the beginning of a new Cold War.

None of this augurs well for the Indian currency.

Passive RBI: Typically, when the rupee weakens, the central bank sells dollars from its reserves to rescue it. So far, though, the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) has not intervened aggressively to shore up the domestic currency.

“The intensity of RBI’s intervention has dissipated,” said Abheek Barua, chief economist at HDFC Bank, India’s biggest private lender. “While there is complete lack of communication from the RBI, comments from officials from the government and quasi-government agencies appear to give the impression that they support this fall in the rupee’s value in the interests of competitiveness.”

US economy: The dollar is having a good run this year due to an uptick in the US’s GDP numbers. That country’s economy grew 4.1% in the second quarter of this year, the fastest since late 2014. It has also been adding more jobs, while average wages have picked up, too.

By all indications, most of these global cues are unlikely to change much in the immediate future. So businesses and individuals in India need to brace themselves.

Hasan said...

Riaz Sb,

How can this data be possible? Every article written by hindustani authors suggests that their country is a fully developed first world powerhouse, just months away from becoming the world's leading superpower...why would people be queueing up to leave such a paradise on earth? It just doesn't make sense. Your data must be part of an ISI conspiracy.

Anonymous said...

It would take only a simple analysis to understand that the rise of asylum applications from India has nothing to do with Modi or any other government in India. Most of the asylum applications are from Punjab, Haryana and Andhra region. Punjab is ruled by Congress, Andhra region by regional parties who are anti-Modi and anti-Congress. Also, predominantly asylum seekers are Sikhs and Hindus (and not Muslims and Dalits). Now there is an irony here. If Muslims and Dalits have the lowest income levels in India and if the claims of their mistreatment were true, it would be those people who would be the ones seeking asylum.

The simple fact is that migration from India is no different than migration from other countries in the region. Its economic migration and predominantly chain migration. Asylum is yet another route to finding greener pastures.

Riaz Haq said...

Anon: "If Muslims and Dalits have the lowest income levels in India and if the claims of their mistreatment were true, it would be those people who would be the ones seeking asylum."

There's lots of data that shows the poorest and the weakest don't migrate. They simply don'r have the basic resources to get passports, buy air tickets and pay agents to make the move.

"One of the more intriguing nuggets about the Africa emigration story is that far from fleeing poverty, migrants out of the continent are likely to be relatively well off, and are rarely from the most destitute families" Mail and Guardian Africa

The above quote comes to mind when answering an oft-repeated question: "Why don't Indian Muslims migrate to Pakistan?" This question of why don't all of the Muslims migrate out of India to Pakistan and other Muslim nations is most often asked by the Hindu Nationalists who seek to make their country 100% "Hindu Rashtra".

http://www.riazhaq.com/2016/06/why-dont-indian-muslims-migrate-to.html

Riaz Haq said...

On September 13, 2018, the US Census Bureau released some of the data from the 2017 American Community Survey (ACS). The survey reflects the U.S. population as of July 1, 2017. The immigrant population, referred to as the foreign-born by the Census Bureau, is comprised of those individuals who were not U.S. citizens at birth. It includes naturalized citizens, legal permanent residents (green card holders), temporary workers, and foreign students. It does not include those born to immigrants in the United States or those born in outlying U.S. territories, such as Puerto Rico. Prior research by the Department of Homeland Security suggests that 1.9 million immigrants (legal and illegal) are missed by the ACS.

https://www.marketwatch.com/press-release/nearly-one-in-seven-us-residents-are-now-immigrants-2018-09-14

The sending countries with the largest increases in the number immigrants since 2010 were India (up 830,215), China (up 677,312), the Dominican Republic (up 283,381), Philippines (up 230,492), Cuba (up 207,124), El Salvador (up 187,783), Venezuela (up 167,105), Colombia (up 146,477), Honduras (up 132,781), Guatemala (up 128,018), Nigeria (up 125,670), Brazil (up 111,471), Vietnam (up 102,026), Bangladesh (up 95,005), Haiti (up 92,603), and Pakistan (up 92,395).

- The sending countries with the largest percentage increases since 2010 were Nepal (up 120%), Burma (up 95%), Venezuela (up 91%), Afghanistan (up 84%), Saudi Arabia (up 83%), Syria (up 75%), Bangladesh (up 62%), Nigeria (up 57%), Kenya (up 56%), India (up 47%), Iraq (up 45%), Ethiopia (up 44%), Egypt (up 34%), Brazil (up 33%), Dominican Republic and Ghana (up 32%), China (up 31%), Pakistan (up 31%), and Somalia (up 29%).


- The states with the largest increases in the number of immigrants since 2010 were Florida (up 721,298), Texas (up 712,109), California (up 502,985), New York (up 242,769), New Jersey (up 210,481), Washington (up 173,891), Massachusetts (up 172,908), Pennsylvania (up 154,701), Virginia (up 151,251), Maryland (up 124,241), Georgia (up 123,009), Michigan (up 116,059), North Carolina (up 110,279), and Minnesota (up 107,760).

- The states with the largest percentage increase since 2010 were North Dakota (up 87%), Delaware (up 37%), West Virginia (up 33%), South Dakota (up 32%), Wyoming (up 30%), Minnesota (up 28%), Nebraska (up 28%), Pennsylvania (up 21%), Utah (up 21%), Tennessee, Kentucky, Michigan, Florida, Washington, and Iowa (each up 20%). The District of Columbia's immigrant population was up 25%.