Tuesday, October 14, 2014

Karachi Entrepreneurs Launch Urdubit Bitcoin Exchange in Pakistan


"We plan to create a platform (Urdubit Bitcoin Exchange) where people feel safe with the world of Bitcoin and hopefully substitute it for trading locally as easily as Pakistani rupees, while giving everyone an opportunity to invest in this commodity." Zain Tariq, Urdubit, Pakistan


Zain Tariq and Danyal Manzar have launched Pakistan's first Bitcoin exchange called Urdudit, according to media reports.

It represents an attempt to introduce Pakistanis to the  digital currency and bring them into the wider Bitcoin community.



As a virtual currency, Bitcoin is created and stored electronically on a computer or mobile device.  There are over a hundred digital currencies in use today but Bitcoin is by far the most popular one and accounts for more than two-thirds of the virtual currency market.

Satoshi Nakamoto, a computer programmer, proposed Bitcoin, which was an electronic payment system based on mathematical proof. The idea was to produce a currency independent of any central authority, transferable electronically, more or less instantly, with extremely low transaction fees.

Unlike national currencies, no one controls Bitcoin. Bitcoins aren’t printed, like dollars or euros – they’re produced by lots of people running computers all around the world, using software that solves mathematical problems. It’s a growing category of money known as cryptocurrency.

Urdubit exchange's main focus is on bringing liquidity to the Pakistani Bitcoin market, and educate the people on the use of the cryptocurrency as a commodity. To accelerate these processes, Tariq and Manzar built a Bitcoin community and advocacy group called BitcoinPk. According to Tariq, Pakistan's Bitcoin community is still small, although active, and rather dispersed.

There's a lot of activity around Bitcoin in Silicon Valley. A number of entrepreneurs, including Pakistanis, are pursuing opportunities offered by digital currencies. One such Silicon Valley Pakistani entrepreneur is Haseeb Awan, co-founder of BitAccess, who is developing Bitcoin ATM machines.

Bitcoin is attracting the attention of law enforcement agencies, tax authorities, and various government regulators, all of whom are trying to understand how the cryptocurrency fits into existing frameworks. US law-enforcement and securities agencies have said at a recent Senate hearing that digital currencies could be legitimate means of exchange, spurring more investments by venture capitalists.

Bitcoin Price Oct 7 2012 to Oct 15 2014 Source: CoinDesk


The legality of your Bitcoin activities will depend on who you are, where you live, and what you are doing with it, according to Coindesk. Bitcoin has proven to be a contentious issue for regulators and law enforcers, both of which have targeted the digital currency in an attempt to control its use. It's still early in the game, and many legal authorities are still struggling to understand the cryptocurrency, let alone legislate around it. It's another case of legislation significantly lagging technology.  In the end, the currency's future will depend on how many consumers and businesses adopt it and eventual recognition of such transactions by various national governments around the world.

Here's a video explaining Bitcoin mining in Urdu:

http://vimeo.com/84558750


CPU MINING Urdu Tutorial from Dablio Raja on Vimeo.

Related Links:

Haq's Musings

Financial Services in Pakistan

Mobile Banking in Pakistan

Pakistan Among Most Popular Outsourcing Destination

Microfinance in Pakistan

Pakistanis in Silicon Valley




8 comments:

Monis R. said...

Unfortunately, I can't imagine that the State Bank of Pakistan would let this fly.

Riaz Haq said...

Monis: "Unfortunately, I can't imagine that the State Bank of Pakistan would let this fly."


SBP will most probably follow the US lead which will involve some govt regulation against use in illicit trade.

Monis R. said...

SBP's regulatory oversight has traditionally been far tighter than the US. I'm sitting at the center of several epayment initiatives and the current framework will render bitcoin illegal under "branchless banking" regulations.

Riaz Haq said...

Monis: "SBP's regulatory oversight has traditionally been far tighter than the US. I'm sitting at the center of several epayment initiatives and the current framework will render bitcoin illegal under "branchless banking" regulations."


I guess it's time to start fighting SBP by creating an advocacy group

Mozzam said...

Riaz: Who are Tariq and manzar?
Did they start from here or from Pakistan? This is a great idea.

Anonymous said...

Lets not think of this as a currency for a min. Think of it as a commodity isnt that what is meant to be listed on NASDAQ? Now think of the possibilities. Currently only UBL allows online credit card merchant processing with very difficult regulations and requirements for high net-worth transactions. What do people do to sell their products online? A big chunk of people can get freelancing jobs with the capability of getting paid without expensive credit card acceptance restrictions. Now think of the trade imbalance and Pakistans biggest trade partner who also generates the biggest investment of bitcoin. I will leave you with 3 sites for more information on bitcoin in pakistan.
https://www.urdubit.com The bitcoin Exchange
http://bitcoin.com.pk bitcoin history and how to mine it yourself with your pc. Run by Danyal
http://www.bitcoinpk.com Run by Zain

Riaz Haq said...

With the global mobile applications (apps) market expected to be worth $25 billion by 2015 — according to a report published by MarketsandMarkets, a global market research and consulting company — everyone, from independent developers and software houses to telecommunication (telecoms) giants, is hard at work to secure their share of the fully-baked pie.
Amid growing demand and increasing competition, many are chasing high-margin outsourcing contracts in developing countries such Pakistan. With an abundance of skilled but cheap labour to offer, the country is rapidly emerging as one of the leading IT outsourcing destinations of the world.
Although mobile apps have been around since the late 90s, the increasing penetration of smartphones in the country — nearly seven to eight million smartphones according to a recent research conducted by a local telecom for its marketing strategy — has made their presence felt more deeply. “The number of smartphones has exceeded the number of computers in the country and this change has come about in the past five years,” says Asad Memon, director operations at Creative Chaos, a high-end custom software development company in Karachi with over 14 years of experience.
It is also the burgeoning utility of smartphones — surpassing that of laptops — which has accounted for the explosive growth of mobile apps. For example, the smartphone’s additional features, such as the orientation sensor (built-in compass) and cell phone triangulation (which collects data to trace the approximate location of a cell phone), assist most apps, including Google maps, to do ingenious things. “The utility of these apps has started making a lot of sense to people,” he highlights, adding that even niche brands have capitalised on the feature to directly reach out to target audiences by advertising through mobile apps. As a result, it has attracted more developers into the technology ecosystem to meet the growing demand.

Asad Memon, director operations at Creative Chaos, traces the trajectory of the mobile apps industry. PHOTO: ARIF SOOMRO
A popular outsourcing destination
When it comes to the global market, Pakistan plays its part as a mobile app developer. “Gora sochta hai, desi karta hai,” says Memon, summarising how foreign clients conceptualise the app and leave Pakistani developers to simply follow directions. Since the average rate charged by an iPhone app developer in the US ranges between $50 and $60 per hour, or more, depending on the brand and the complexity of the app, a cheaper solution is to outsource it to countries that quote the lowest price. Despite India being a much cheaper alternative, their issues with quality-control make Pakistan the next best alternative. “What sets Pakistan apart is the costing and the relationship of trust that has been established by delivering quality apps on time, depending on the company [developing the app],” says Memon. A basic app developed by a local software house can cost anywhere between Rs400,000 to Rs10 million, while the more sophisticated ones can go up to Rs20 million, depending on the company’s profile. Time difference is an additional advantage for Pakistan. “By the time we wake up, we are ready to incorporate changes based on the feedback we get,” he says. In certain cases, a team of 140 developers is dedicated to look after a single foreign client.

http://tribune.com.pk/story/786759/mobile-applications-a-test-of-apptitude/

Riaz Haq said...

#Urdu version of Whatsapp soon to be launched in #Pakistan http://en.dailypakistan.com.pk/technology/urdu-version-of-whatsapp-soon-to-be-launched/#.VbZt6vE8OvA.twitter

Whatsapp for androids has been fully translated into Urdu and will soon be launched in Pakistan.

This milestone is achieved by Ahsan Saeed who works as a Translation Administrator for WhatsApp, the Tech Juice reported.

Ahsan, along with his team of hardworking volunteers, translated 753 strings and moderated 2089 strings in less than three months.

With this achievement, Urdu has become the 18th language that Whatsapp has been officially translated to.

After the announcement of translation of all government websites into Urdu, the Urdu version of Whatsapp targets a wider local audience.

With the increased usage of 3G/4G mobile internet and smartphones, a huge chunk of population will be able to get the advantage of the messaging which failed to do so otherwise due to the language barrier.